The long lost project

13 Feb

I headed back to the shop this weekend as planned and worked on an ongoing project. A project that keeps getting set aside! So much so that I realized the other day that I started this project about a year ago! Wow. I feel terrible! Oh well, life goes on, and this project is back in my life, so there’s hope for it yet!

I found a proper storage place for my workpieces out of harm's way under my bench. My intent was to keep them from getting dinged, but I also kind of forgot about them- oops!

I found a proper storage place for my workpieces out of harm’s way under my bench. My intent was to keep them from getting dinged, but I also kind of forgot about them- oops!

My shop is currently tucked away under a hefty amount of snow. The layers have some ice mixed in, so I didn't even bother shoveling a path, I just slid into the shop and climbed out.

My shop is currently tucked away under a hefty amount of snow. The layers have some ice mixed in, so I didn’t even bother shoveling a path, I just slid into the shop and climbed out.

My goal for the day was to dive back into the table project. Three in total. Specifically to continue marking out joints. I had drawn up some sketchup plans of the tables, with rough measurements- but still had to calculate where each tenon and mortise would go.

And a dovetail in the example above! I found my toolclad table saw cover came in handy during this stage of my project! I was about to draw out a dovetail and needed the angle to set my sliding t-bevel and voila! I had my angle set in no time.

And a dovetail in the example above! I found my toolclad table saw cover came in handy during this stage of my project! I was about to draw out a dovetail and needed the angle to set my sliding t-bevel to and voila!

I also used the grid and scale on the toolclad cover to help me orient my parts and keep them square . I’m a fan of relative measurements as they really help to keep things fool-proof.

By the end of my visit I was successful in marking out at least four joints on each table- many more to go- but honestly I have yet to decided what some of the joints will be! I'll start with the ones I do know.

By the end of my visit I was successful in marking out at least four joints on each table- many more to go- but honestly I have yet to decide what some of the joints will be! I’ll start with the ones I do know.

Next visit I’ll be working on cutting all of the joints I marked out. I’m excited to see these parts come together! I’ve known them for so long in their flat-packed state that I was beginning to think they were going to remain that way! Piles no more I say- time for these sticks of wood to transform into furniture! Stay tuned for more joinery magic. ‘Til then, happy woodworking.

Home is where the heart is

8 Feb

This winter hasn’t been the best for visiting my shop. I’ve been tired, a little blue, and distracted by work, car troubles, and family obligations. I’ve been longing for my shop to be CLOSER. A thirty minute drive can be a huge deterrent to just popping in and tinkering on this project and that. Add to that the fact that winter makes me want to hibernate, and I’m left with very few shop visits. I hope to move into a house in the next couple of years, and one of my priorities will be to have a shop space attached. It’s a very exciting thought- to be just steps away from resuming a project. Ideally I’d like to find a basement workshop or even a garage, either would probably be just as large as the shop I currently have. I have a real estate listing or two on the fridge that I consider dream options- but I’m willing to compromise!

All this to say that I visited my shop for a second or two while visiting my mom yesterday, and I miss it! I went in on the pretense of checking for leaks etc., but I really just wanted to be in the shop. I suddenly realized that part of the reason I’ve been feeling a little blue of late is that I haven’t had shop time. It didn’t occur to me because I basically woodwork all day at my job- so how could I be missing woodworking? The answer is simple, work is not the same as time in my shop, doing what I want, how I want. I really want those two things to mesh into one eventually. But for now I have to recognize that I haven’t been fulfilling a need. So starting this weekend I will head back to the shop and kick up some sawdust.

Here are a few pictures of a little reorganization I did over the holidays.

Before shot:

IMG_20121215_155339

When I suddenly added this sander to the shop I had to think quick and come up with a stand for it to sit on. I happened to have a workmate lying around so I used it for this end, but as you can see it was a clunky affair, not really a permanent solution.

After pic of sander:

While this stand may also just be temporary, I find it much more easy to tolerate as it has opened up loads of space that I frankly wasn’t functioning well without!

Before pics of fastener storage:

A flurry of cutting my parts to dimension was the beginning of the project. Then followed a lot of edge banding.

Top left you can see my previous fastener storage system on the end of my bench.

It's a bit cleaner than this now. There's a dust collector in the background. I haven't found a window treatment for the door window yet...

In this photo you can just barely see the back right corner held blue bins along the wall for fasteners. It worked for a while but eventually the racks failed and the bins would drop off the wall spilling their contents all over the floor.

After pic of fastener storage:

This storage solution, which incorporates my paper dispenser for protecting my work-surfaces during glue ups, has me wondering why I didn’t think of it sooner! Ah what a difference!!

Yesterday I noted how much this reorganization session had changed my space for the better. My previous setup had created a lot of frustration from tripping over the workmate, and from searching for dropped/ spilled items on the floor. I’m certain that the current state of the shop will improve how productive I am in the shop.

As an aside, I recently had to suffer through a bout of  second hand car shopping, as my car (that I recently posted about!) needed replacing much sooner than anticipated. I had been wanting to change up from a sedan for quite a while as I found it was a rather formidable limitation to woodworking. I couldn’t pick up machinery, or transport furniture that I’d built with a sedan, although picking up boards of wood was surprisingly possible. Because I wanted to purchase a car outright rather than be tied to payments, I went with a second hand car. And because I wanted more flexibility to transport woodworking related items, I went with a hatchback. And finally because I was worried about day to day fuel consumption I compromised a bit on size. The car I went with has 64 cubic feet of cargo space.

2003 Suzuki Aerio SX

I just thought it was interesting to mention that woodworking can even influence a car purchase! Also I figured out that in a few years when I might need a “real” woodworker’s car, with more cargo space I might want to get a Honda Element- the cargo configurations were made for surfers and mountain bikers, but they also would work perfectly for woodworkers!

Happy woodworking!

Projects of every colour

14 Dec

I’ve been working away on projects – but unfortunately I haven’t had as much time for woodworking projects of late!

Projects outside the shop:

I have a really old car- one that I may have to retire in the coming years. I decided to convert it into an art car to see it out with a bang.

I have a really old car- one that I may have to retire in the coming years. I decided to convert it into an art car to see it out with a bang.

I picked up some white paint markers and researched what I wanted to put on the car, and then I set felt tip to enamel paint.

I picked up some white paint markers and researched what I wanted to put on the car, and then I set felt tip to enamel paint.

My goal is to cover most of the car with animals.

My goal is to cover most of the car with animals.

I've since set down my marker as the temps had me shivering as I worked... but the project will be ongoing.

I’ve since set down my marker as the temps had me shivering as I worked… but the project will be ongoing.

I also was working on this for quite a while, and finally wrapped it up a few days ago! I look forward to having more time for the shop now that my focus is shifting back towards woodworking.

I also was working on this for quite a while, and finally wrapped it up a few days ago! I look forward to having more time for the shop now that my focus is shifting back towards woodworking.

 

In fact…

I have this cheap ikea lamp that has been broken for ages- and yesterday the superglue failed and I had to tape it together...

I have this cheap ikea lamp that has been broken for ages- and yesterday the superglue failed and I had to tape it together…

...I kept it just to have the cylinder as a sample and thought maybe I should make a veneer replacement! Perhaps with marquetry if the curve allows. So now I have it in my mind that I am going to save this lamp and make it 100x better!

…I kept it just to have the cylinder as a sample and thought maybe I should make a veneer replacement! Perhaps with marquetry if the curve allows. So now I have it in my mind that I am going to save this lamp and make it 100x better!

What little I have accomplished in the shop:

My mom has a stool that failed recently. The upholstered seat broke down the middle.

My mom has a stool that failed recently. The upholstered LDF seat broke down the middle.

So it was my job to build a replacement seat.

So it was my job to build a replacement seat.

I started by pushing the two pieces of the seat as tightly together as possible to trace duplicates, then I cut out the plywood blanks on the table saw.

I started by pushing the two pieces of the seat as tightly together as possible to trace duplicates, then I cut out the plywood blanks on the table saw.

Next I cut out the curves...

Next I cut out the curves…

...at the bandsaw

…at the bandsaw

And finally I smoothed the bandsawn circle and I broke the edges so that the seat wouldn't feel uncomfortable.

And finally I smoothed the bandsawn circle and I broke the edges so that the seat wouldn’t feel uncomfortable.

Here's a picture of the stools to five you and idea of the finished product!

Here’s a picture of the stools to give you an idea of the finished product!

You may have noticed that I milled up two seats- that is because the stool is part of a set and I expect the other seat might fail somewhere along the line so I wanted to mill both at the same time to save myself the hassle later on! I would have replaced the other seat right away (before it fails!) except I couldn’t face all those staples again. By the time I had removed the staples from the first seat, mill up the seats, re-upholstered the seat and reassembled the stool, I was too tired to repeat the process for the second stool.

The holidays are coming and am every so pleased that I get about two weeks off from work. And while I expect a lot of visiting with family and friends I also plan to make some time to visit my shop and work on some shop fixtures that have been nagging at me- and some much needed woodworking projects. Stay tuned! Happy woodworking and happy holidays!

Hand-me-down tools!!

3 Dec

This weekend I scored some nice hand me down tools! My grandmother was holding on to my grandfather’s tools for quite some time it seems! I had no idea, and was ever so delighted to receive the “treasure”.

The new to me tools even came in a tool chest. It was too heavy for one person to lift!

The new to me tools even came in a tool chest. It was too heavy for one person to lift!

What goodies live in here?!

What goodies live in here?!

Some rasps and files in pretty good condition.

Some rasps and files in pretty good condition.

The tins are full of drill bits.

Some tins full of drill bits.

Not as handy for woodworking, but pleased to have these none the less.

Some nice hammers and wrenches.

I have a spoke shave from my dad, but this one has much less rust and will need less tuning

This spoke shave which is in better condition than the one I got from my dad.

hoo boy I will need to tune these up quite a bit, but I look forward to finding out if they keep an edge well!

hoo boy I will need to tune these up quite a bit, but I look forward to finding out if they keep an edge well!

For measuring and tapping holes with threads.

For my fine measuring and hole tapping needs.

Super pleased with the sliding t-bevel as I only had a cheapo plastic one from my dad. The tightening lever isn't optimal but I can live with it.

Super pleased with the sliding t-bevel as I only had a cheapo plastic one from my dad. The tightening lever isn’t optimal but I can live with it.

I'll need to tune the drill but it came with a wide assortment of bits- very interested to see how well it works when it's tuned.

I’ll need to tune the drill but it came with a wide assortment of bits- very interested to see how well it works when it’s tuned.

I really needed these!

I really needed these!

I've been wanting the rebate plane below for a while- who knew my grandfather had one! I feel like it was meant to be! I have to buy a knicker for it but it seems to have the other parts

I’ve been wanting a rebate plane like this for a while- who knew my grandfather had one! I feel like it was meant to be! I have to buy a knicker for it but it seems to have the other parts

I hear all three of these lovelies. I had a broken heart over my aunt getting the other saw that went with this one.

I heart all three of these lovelies. My aunt had dibs on the other saw that went with this one- I wish I could have kept them both!

My grandfather kept a bag of something in the tool box that prevents rust, so I’m pleased that most of the tools are in good  condition especially for having spent years/decades  out in a humid/unheated  shed. I feel like a kid in a candy store. I don’t prefer tool chests, but I will probably find a place to keep this one simply because it was my grandfathers and it’s instantly sentimental for me. Who knows maybe the tool chest idea will grow on me as I use this one.

Verdict is in…

17 Nov

….annnnnnd I have a white card! As of yesterday I accepted the offer to become a permanent worker- I’ll sign officially in a week or so.

Yehoo! For the first time in my life I have a secure job with benefits- for as long as I want it. Although most of my artist friends look down on my “factory job”  in Aerospace, I can’t help but feel proud of the accomplishment, and feel a bit giddy at some of the freedoms it will give me. It’s no ordinary factory job, there are no conveyor belts etc., we’re doing custom work in a more cozy setting . I have a calm and safe workplace, I build something that I’m proud of, and I’ve made some good friends.

What will become of me now!?

My original plan was to work at least two different jobs in the woodworking industry to diversify my experience and I’ve done that.

I also planned to work to buy tools. And I’ve done that. (and frankly there’s no end to the tools, but I have a great foundation now)

Next I planned to slowly but surely build a customer base by making furniture on the side. I wanted to start my business with the least amount of risk. That’s where I’m at now.

The goals stay the same but some are gaining priority…

The problem is that the third and final phase of my plan I’ve found to be a bit flawed in practice. I don’t have the energy to tackle full scale furniture projects on a deadline. I need to work at a leisurely pace, and still have time to live outside the shop. My first commission was a trial run that proved difficult on my everyday life. To make matters more complicated some of life’s other priorities have crept in- having a family and home-ownership are bumping my woodworking business plans down a peg or two.

The revised plan

I still plan to start my own woodworking business, but I want to put less pressure on myself and say that it happens when it happens. I need to actually discover what my niche will be- which I’d like to come to in a natural way by experimenting. I would hate to start hastily by doing the first thing that comes to mind and then get pegged into making a particular product that I didn’t even feel passionate about. The world feels full of possibility again!

Let the experiments begin!

Hard copy Magazines and Online Subscriptions

15 Nov

Hey friends! I’ve been thinking of subscribing to one or two new woodworking magazines/websites to diversify my woodworking fount of knowledge.

Currently I only subscribe to Finewoodworking online. Once upon a time I received hard copy of the magazine but I hate storing them and finding info in the stack is painstaking. I much prefer searching a database of articles and printing out the ones that are pertinent to the task at hand. Or flipping through the magazine online so that I don’t have to store the thing afterwards.

So here are my questions to you:

Do you prefer hard copy or online magazine subscriptions?

And most importantly:

Which are your favourite subscriptions? (I could use the advice before subscribing willy nilly!)

 

 

Klingspor to the rescue… again!

4 Nov

As I mentioned earlier, I bought a Ridgid combination spindle sander/ belt sander recently. I had decided that it was a necessary tool. I’ve worked with belt sanders at both of my jobs in the woodworking industry and they shave so much time off of certain tasks that I finally convinced myself to just make room in the shop for it.

So I made the room.

While I was at it I picked up replacement sanding drums and belts. That way I’d be prepared with different grits, and fully loaded for my upcoming projects. I’ve already used it so much that I feel the tool is worth it’s weight in gold.

To my chagrin the belts that I bought at Homedepot (Freud Diablo brand) were loose even after sliding the tension lever all the way home. This led to the belt flapping about and then sliding down and sanding the inside of the machine! I promptly turned off the sander and adjusted the knob that repositions the belt up or down the assembly. This didn’t help the situation at any point because the belt was too loose. The package said it was the right size 24″x4″. Yet when I put the original belt(that came with the sander) back onto the machine it tracked perfectly with no problems- I knew then that it wasn’t my machine. So back to the store the belts went for a full refund.
I recently bought sanding discs for my ROS (random orbit sander) from Klingspor so that’s where I turned next. I did some quick internet research to see if other Ridgid belt sander owners had used Klingspor belts successfully. I did find confirmation of that so I ordered some belts. I received the belts a week or so ago and tried them out- worked perfectly!

The most amazing part is the deal I got! I’m glad the first belts went back to the store because  just 2 belts had cost $12. Klingspor offers a deal on a combo pack of  30 belts for $20 (6 assorted grits). I still can’t believe what a great deal that is! I’ll be sanding for a long while on those 30 belts! They appear to be better quality than the belts I got from Homedepot, plus I have a crepe stick to clean the paper with, so I’m all set. Thanks Klingspor!

Now I have 5 of each of the following grits: 60,80,100,120,150,180.

Next thing this sander needs is a dust shroud,  which the machine doesn’t come with, nor does the manufacturer produce one. Luckily I found one that Kevin May made here. It seems perfect so I’ll probably just model mine after his as closely as possible. Kevin’s shroud design is easily removed, and also has a hinged part that swings out of the way to access the spindle end of the edge sander without removing the shroud.

On the job front I am sill twaiting for the final word, things are tense. I should know sometime this coming week- possibly Monday- but I’m trying not to hold my breath!

P.S. Klingspor  sells more than just sandpaper!

Finally, my shop has a dust separator! I bought one that fits regular sized buckets because I happened to have one on hand. I wasn’t ready to fork over $60-$90 for a Dust Right or Oneida version, so this $15 lid fit the bill very well. Can’t wait to try it out.

In the balance…the day job

24 Oct

I’ve never worked for such a big company before. I’ve worked as a glassblower, with my sister and father. I’ve worked as a dog walker for a very small business. I’ve worked for a studio that made bracelets and vases out of veneer- again very small 8 people involved max. I’ve worked a handful of other jobs along with my freelance pet portrait painting gig- even smaller operations than the above. Almost all of my jobs have had very little contact with others during my work day. I could easily go hours without talking to another human.

Very little of my previous work experience prepared me for this job in aerospace. I had the skill set but that’s about it. I’ve adapted to  talking to MANY of my coworkers throughout the day and I feel I am better for it. But on the flip side I’ve learned how frustrating it can be to work for such a big business.

Building private jets requires a lot of people, a lot of parts, and a lot of space (not to mention a lot of $$). It also requires a lot of paperwork. If there is the tiniest problem, there’s a form for that. And because of all of these people, parts, spaces, papers, and problems the whole thing is a huge orchestration! From an employee standpoint; It’s far from perfect and it’s far from personal. But it’s a very good business.

All this to explain that because the company is so big and has so many priorities, rules and paperwork; structured chaos if you will- my job is in the balance. I was laid off last November for three months. The rumour mill at work has been churning out all kinds of juicy info about our jobs for months now- but here’s the short version:

In two weeks I, along with potentially 50 other contractors (in order of seniority), MAY be given our white cards and permanent employee status. (with this I’d get benefits, a union, and more job security plus paid vacations)

OR

In two weeks I along with all of the woodworking contractors (more than 50 ppl) MAY be laid off. (with this I’d lose my seniority, have no re-hire date given to me in advance, and there’s the possibility that they wouldn’t hire me back at all (at least 20 people didn’t come back last time))

 

Which will it be? I’m trying to stay optimistic but kind of preparing myself for the worst at the same time. Stay tuned and I’ll let you know! Wish me luck!

My first commission … the never ending project ends

17 Oct

Hooray! After many weeks of toil I finally wrapped up my first commission.

It was a surprise to me how much I had underestimated the time it would take me to complete the project. I felt like I was treading in quicksand as each deadline passed. I hate missing deadlines. As much as I was looking forward to getting my first commission I’ve learned a valuable lesson. Don’t bite off more than you can chew! As I found out, two hour sessions in the shop don’t allow for very much momentum and flow. So I’ve resolved that before taking on future commissions I’ll carefully assess how much time I’d need to complete the project, and the complexity or amount of procedures involved and then ensure that the timeline is loose enough that I can still have a life outside of woodworking (which I haven’t had much of these past weeks!). Above all I want to make sure that woodworking doesn’t become a stressful activity that I start to hate!

Without further ado here are is the wrap up of my first woodworking commission!

I last left off with the seven pullout surfaces completed and delivered. Next I moved on to  building drawers…

I started by re-sawing the stock I was given. I set up my shop made bandsaw fence to account for drift and was pleased with the results. BUT feed rate made all the difference, on the right I fed the stock too quickly and the blade wandered. I then began feeding the stock at a more moderate feed rate and the rest of the re-sawing came out like the example on the left. Luckily the wobbly cut pcs. still planed out all the bandsaw marks.

I then pre-milled the boards and let them sit a few days on stickers before milling them to final dimension.

I was pretty impressed with the cut quality of my planer. There were some that tore out no matter which direction they were fed, but others came out smooth as silk. Sapele has reversing grain all over the place- it sure isn’t predictable!

I had to laminate some boards and then I cut them all down to size for the drawers.

Next I cut the joints at the router table- rebates and grooves.

Here are some of the parts awaiting assembly.

I then assembled all the drawers…

Then I fitted all the drawer bottoms…

And then I sanded them, here are the final drawers.

Four drawers in total.

Next I worked on the remote control caddies:

I started by cutting out my parts.

I then glued the faux frame and panel together.

The clamps at work

 

I then rounded over the top inside edge of the sides, and added a rebate for the bottom at the router table.

I then ganged up each pair with the routered parts facing each other and cut the angle at the bandsaw and smoothed that out at the edge sander …

… which I just bought myself as a birthday gift! Let me count the ways I love thee ridgid edge sander / spindle sander! I’ve already used it so much that I don’t doubt it was an excellent buy.

Next I realised I had read the plans wrong and the faux frame and panel was a bit too short! I hemmed and hawed a bit then decided to add a wood lip on the top edge to lengthen the panel. I edgebanded right over the endgrain on this late addition. It turned out to be a seamless fix that I quite like.

And the final assembly! The sheet stock off cuts in the middle are just spacer blocks.

Here they are completed. You can see here how the edge banding covers the endgrain of the top trim. The center of the panel will recieve moulding and the caddy will be mounted against a panel of the built-in which is why it doesn’t require a back.

And finally I worked on the wine glass racks:

Onwards I went with the wine glass racks. I cut out the parts and edge banded all of the parts first.

Here’s my set up for filing the edge banding flush.

Three sides on 7pieces and all four sides on 7 other pieces. That’s a lot of edge banding.

I drilled mounting holes in the backs.

I used two large push blocks when routing the profiles and that kept me safe and the profile consistent.

I decided to rip the molding off of the board each time so that I could work with a larger more stable board at the router table.

I sanded these moldings a little before moving on to the next step.

I cut all my moldings to size at the mitre saw.

I used tape to clamp the glue-ups, but I’d love to get some mitre spring clamps.

I pre-drilled holes and then screwed on the backs to the bottoms

Which gave me this. Oh yeah I forgot to mention that I sanded all the parts just before assembly.

Then I cut spacers and sighted the middle of the molding, then secured each end with one screw.

Which gave me this.

Here they are in all their glory. The racks will be fastened to the insides of the built-in’s cabinet doors, and then wine glasses will be stored in these racks.

I delivered each batch as it was completed and the final batch was just delivered to Tim on Monday. He still has to coat them with finish and have the components installed in the built in. The last batch I was the least proud of- some of my mitres were fugly- but I will now take the time to adjust my miter saw and even build a 45degree shooting board so that I can quickly fine tune miters. A mitre jig for the table saw and a hold down jig for the mitre saw might also materialize. I’ll probably also get some clamps in the near future- I seem to have  awkwardly long/heavy clamps and none suited to smaller and/or finicky glue-ups.

Progress at a snails pace…my first commission!

3 Oct

Greetings woodworking friends! If I’ve been absent from the blogosphere it hasn’t been on purpose. I’ve been hard at work on my first woodworking commission! I’ve been pushing hard to visit the shop as often as possible. It’s a half hour drive from my home, so it certainly takes some orchestration. I’ve been getting in about 2hrs at the shop before I have to head off to work. As with most woodworking projects I feel I underestimated the time it would take! And working 2hrs at a time is really a stop and start method I don’t recommend. I recall reading that one of the woodworking bloggers can only get in half hour increments in his shop- I couldn’t even imagine! Even 2hrs amounts to a couple of sawdust blinks and it’s over!

The commish (haha remember that show?)

My apprenticeship mentor (“Tim Timberland” as earlier mentioned in my blog- not his real name!) provided me with this- my first woodworking commission. He has been transforming a room over several months into a study that basically IS a built-in. All four walls are covered by a monumental built-in. Now that he’s wrapping up the project he has had an overflow of work and called in for extra hands. All that’s left are small components that complete the built-in: drawers, pullout writing surfaces, and some caddies that will hold remote controls(to be hung next to a couch) and wine glasses(to be hung on the inside of cabinet doors).

Visuals!

Tim provided me with materials, some detailed plans, and even some samples!

The designs are a mix of veneered sheet goods and solid wood.

I kind of lucked out that Tim had pre-cut all of the materials- it made for hassle free transportation of the materials, and more-over my shop is small so I didn’t have to cut down full sized sheet goods.

Here’s a sample of the pullout surfaces- it’s a cut-away. These will be mounted inside the built-in and the fronts will receive drawer fronts.

And the build…

And so it began! I started with a flurry of cutting parts to size at the table saw. Scroll saw pictured here was just a place for my parts to collect.

A lot of edge banding followed.

Pictured here are all the parts needed to make the pullout surfaces. The far right pile is edge banded on three edges.

Next I put together the sub-assembly of the pullouts. With glue…

…and brads.

And more edge banding ensued.

Next it was time to start assembling- slides and the pullout bases.

But first I stopped to sand my parts. I wanted to use my new sander but it seemed a little heavy for veneer and I’m not used to it yet.

First I attached the slides to part of the base.

Then I screwed the slides onto undersides of the pullout surfaces.Shown here with a 1/8 spacer block, and a registration block that helped position the slides.

Here it is once installed.

Next I added the final parts to the base with glue and brads.

My fingers are holding up a 1/8″ spacer block to show how I aligned the parts. The surface is 1/8″ narrower than the base, and is set 1/8″ forward on the base so that the base will not interfere with the pullout closing.

Now to get your bearings on this built-in component, here it is upside-down…

…and here it is right side up. I pulled it out to demonstrate the full extension slides.

And finally here is the stack that I delivered earlier this week.

I have lots of the other parts all cut to dimension and they are awaiting routing and edge-banding, sanding and assembly. For clarity purposes I’ll present each component from start to finish in a post. In reality space and time are a jumble in the shop and any number of the components move forward with each machine set-up and shop visit.

I wish things would go a bit faster, I feel like I’m letting Tim down. But I can only do what I can fit in the time I’m given. So I’ll just keep trucking. The stress aside- it really feels great to get in the shop and build something with purpose and it’s giving me a chance to test out how effective my tool selections have been. I know now that I need to tuneup my jointer soon, but that I really do have most of my bases covered.

Tomorrow I head off to the shop again- wish me luck!

Til next time, happy woodworking!

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