I’m moved in… a tale of four colds & crazy times

10 Nov

My goodness an entire season has gone by since my last post! It’s a good thing I’m not paid to do this! I just checked what my last post was and it was camper demolition day- I hope I can  work on that again before the winter! So look for the change of season in the next video  ha ha!

Long story short; since august I’ve had four colds (unless I’ve lost track!) because moving house (Sept 1st) really took it out of me. The last time I’d moved was six years before, and I sure hope I don’t have to move again any time soon. I’m the type that really likes to unpack ASAP and get most of my living space darn close to perfected before I can start to relax.  That said it still took the better part of seven weeks to get my home house-warming-party-ready. Putting up shelves, racks, rods, mirrors, pictures, and painting each room sure did take a lot of  time/sweat/money.  I admit that I even had to buy some flat packed furniture and assemble it. I wanted more than anything to build the items myself but knew that I certainly didn’t have the time/health/patience to build two bookshelves, a shoe rack bench, a pantry and a bathroom wall cabinet- all whilst living out of boxes. And I’m sure it would have taken me a while!  That said, I am a little bit scarred by the quality and assembling methods used in some of the items mentioned. I can’t even imagine how long each will take to completely fail. Disposable furniture really is depressing when you think about the waste- and know the difference from good quality furniture.

And while on the long story short tack- here it all is- in pictures!

Enjoy!

Packing  for the move was a drawn out process that lasted weeks. This room was at a downright functional stage at the time of this photo, it got to be a survival game by the end.

Packing for the move was a drawn out process that lasted weeks. This room was at a downright functional stage at the time of this photo, it got to be a survival game by the end.

 

Examples of the cabinet, rack and shelves I assembled and put up. The cabinet box I bought at a home reno store, but the doors, hinges and knobs I got from a habitat for humanity store.

Examples of the cabinet, rack and shelves I assembled and put up. The cabinet box I bought at a home reno store, but the doors, hinges and knobs I got from a habitat for humanity store.

This was the view from my backyard a couple of weeks ago when the leaves were at their peak. Now those trees are bare!

This was the view from my backyard a couple of weeks ago when the leaves were at their peak. Now those trees are bare!

Assembling the pantry drawers.

Assembling the pantry drawers. Don’t judge the dishes everywhere- I was probably on cold 2. This room has since been transformed also.

One of the attractive elements to my new place is the direct sunlight filtering in. The door that blocked out all of this beautiful light from the hallway just had to be replaced! The classifieds yielded this nice French door.

One of the attractive elements to my new place is the direct sunlight filtering in. The door that blocked out all of this beautiful light from the hallway just had to be replaced! The classifieds yielded this nice French door.

 

So I learnt how to install a door- and no I didn't get it on the first try. I bought the door with one glass pane missing, so at some point in the near future I will be replacing it to keep out cold drafts. The daylight in the hallway made a HUGE difference. Also note the racks that had to be assembled and/or put up.
So I learnt how to install a door- and no I didn’t get it on the first try. I bought the door with one glass pane missing, so at some point in the near future I will be replacing it to keep out cold drafts. The daylight in the hallway made a HUGE difference. Also note the racks that had to be assembled and/or put up.
Let there be light! You can't really tell because of the backlighting but these bookcases are red. I was impressed with the build quality compared to the pantry because the structural pieces were all made of plywood. All the same I'm not sure how long the finish and hardware will last.

Let there be light! You can’t really tell because of the back-lighting but these bookcases are red. I was impressed with the build quality compared to the pantry because the structural pieces were all made of plywood.

You can see that the daylight in the hallway did not go unnoticed. Also, good help is hard to find.

You can see that the daylight in the hallway did not go unnoticed. Also, good help is hard to find.

Okay so this was the state of my new tool room weeks ago, I admit that it's much better now, but still kind of a designated catch-all room as our closet space is somewhat limited. It's tight at 7' x 11' but I'll take what I can get. The table is now cleared and there are fewer boxes, but I really need to figure out some things in there and it seems to be the last priority. More photos to come of this space.

Okay so this was the state of my new tool room weeks ago, I admit that it’s much better now, but still kind of a designated catch-all room as our closet space is somewhat limited. It’s tight at 7′ x 11′ but I’ll take what I can get. The table is now cleared and there are fewer boxes, but I really need to figure out some things! More photos to come.

This concludes the long story short tale, and cold number four is almost over! Here’s hoping my immune system will get back to it’s old self! One cold per year sounds heavenly about now!

Happy woodworking

Demolition day caught on film… Blair Witch style.

4 Aug

You’re in for a bumpy ride folks. I took my camera along with me as I set to dismantling the rotting camper and my camera man skills leave a lot to be desired. So let’s just say if you found Blair Witch made you motion sick, then you might want to keep a little bag handy as you watch this.

I found a few things pretty funny about this video. Number one was a dog sighting early on- introductions were not made.  Number two was when I demonstrated my method for taking down the walls- the video was not sped up!  Number three happens at about 7:05 listen for it *plink* *thud*. And finally it’s kind of hilarious how by the last scene you can actually hear it in my voice how completely drained I was after a couple of hours of demolition spent in a toasty camper.

So as I mentioned in the last blog post, I’m about 70% done ridding the property of rotten wood. So you can just imagine how much was on the property before! A whole fence line was barricaded with rotting pallets of wood. I had to take as many down as  I could several weeks in a row. There were also several piles of branches from trimming trees over time, and a bit of fire wood too. Here are the pics.

This is probably the 8th time I've set a pile like this out on the curb.

This is probably the 8th time I’ve set a pile like this out on the curb.

These pallets were used to improvise a taller fence.

These pallets were used to improvise a taller fence. Since they’re sitting directly on the ground and have been around for years, they’re a rotten mess.

Behind is a small wrought iron fence that the dogs used to easily jump over in the winter. Now that's not a problem- but the ants are!

Behind is a small wrought iron fence that the dogs used to easily jump over in the winter. Now that’s not a problem- but the ants are!

Looks okay from the outside...

Starting from zero

Starting from zero

Demo time.

Demo time.

This camper wasn't commercially manufactured if you were wondering. It was built by my dad and his friends.

This camper wasn’t commercially manufactured if you were wondering. It was built by my dad and his friends.

I found that I only used my crowbars after my hammer. I couldn't seem to pry from the edges because they were often glued to the studs with construction adhesive.

I found that I only used my crowbars after my hammer. I couldn’t seem to pry from the edges because they were often glued to the studs with construction adhesive.

The wreckage will get curbed before I remove the roof and siding.

The wreckage will get curbed before I remove the roof and siding.

The future looks bright… and clear

1 Aug

So while the dust in my shop has had time to settle, I’ve been making progress in other areas.  As I may have mentioned, I was planning a move sometime soon- well those plans have solidified and  I now know when and where I’m moving to. While I originally had lofty dreams of a new home-shop I tuned into the reality that I wasn’t quite ready to buy a house yet! I also soon realised that most of the apartments that had a one car garage or an unfinished basement were also out of my price range or just located too far from where I wanted to live.

What I did get was an apartment with a small spare room that will be my shop away from my shop. I at least succeeded in swinging some kind of work space! Since it’s an apartment and noise will be a factor I will bring mostly hand tools and perhaps a scroll saw and drill press to this mini shop. Since I still have my real shop I can machine parts on weekends and then refine them at home. I think this will help prevent my projects from dragging on as long as they do. The move will happen in September. One short month away. I plan to post some pics of the room as it takes shape. But first will be a lot of packing, and paint swatches etc..

In other news I summoned all my courage and had Lasik surgery done last week. I was pretty terrified but everything went as planned and my eyes are presently healing up nicely. I can now see 20/20 without glasses through the miracle of science. I feel like a new person. I look forward to getting rid of my prescription safety glasses which btw did not protect my eyes from countless encounters with saw dust.  As a bonus for my woodworking, everything now appears much closer and larger than when I wore glasses- which I can only think will help when cutting to a line.

I visited my shop earlier today. The place fills me both with guilt and contentment. I feel guilty when I think of how seldom I visit it these days, and then there’s just a wave of contentment that fills me when I enter it and am surrounded by the tools of my craft. It’s like a drug. I can’t wait  to have that feeling in my own home- whenever I please. While I don’t plan on getting much woodworking done until I have my new apartment all set up (probably by October) I am working to maintain the grounds my shop lives on. You see there’s a carpenter ant problem in my shop, and while I became aware of it a year or so ago, I wasn’t able to rid the food source before winter fell. So once spring came around I set to ridding the property of rotting wood which is what these ants are drawn to.  Thankfully the garbage men don’t mind hauling this stuff away, so I’ve been curbing it in batches. I’m about 70% done now so I feel like there is an end in sight.  Unfortunately part of this removal operation will include dismantling a camper that is rotting away on the property. I started on that today by taking out countless screws from the siding. Tomorrow I plan to  take a crowbar to the interior . I’ll probably take the camera along as witness. Wish me luck!

Half life- woodworking interrupted

28 Jun

I just realised HOW much I wish I could share details of my work life in aerospace on this blog. It is so interesting- so unique, and a huge part of my woodworking life right now. Alas I’m bound by a contract not to share information online or otherwise. A picture speaks a thousands words- and no pictures from work can grace these posts. How I wish it wasn’t so. One time  after a big presentation in a hangar next to one of our planes, I dared to take a photo of the plane and two people rushed up to me saying I couldn’t disseminate the photo- but I could keep it. I deleted the photo- which was blurry anyway. I feel like a spy or something, I have a secret woodworking life.

When I first started in aerospace I kind of realised that since the materials are SO different from normal woodworking that I was really developing a whole new skill set and perhaps not honing the woodworking skill set I was hoping to. That has proven to be true for the most part. But in recent  days I’ve noticed a change in my overall work practices. So some of the skills are transferable. I’m quicker, have a different concept of precision, I’m more focused than ever, and I’m much better at tackling things I’ve never done before- I can adapt easily. I did something just yesterday that I’m certain I would have struggled to do a year ago- I would have hemmed an hawed over how to clamp my work pieces as I worked on them, I would have spent a lot of time designing my jig and I would have probably scraped a piece somewhere along the way. But no- I owned that jig. It was done well from conception to completion. I felt like a fine tuned machine. I think that’s what I like best about woodworking is that feeling of everything just kind of clicking into place when it could so easily go wrong at every turn. We conquer the chaos of information and variables before us.

Are all woodworkers in some way or another anal? I wonder. I think we are brave- and I’m not even talking about scary machines here- we have to lunge ahead with each next step knowing that the previous step turned out well but now we risk messing it all up. If I’ve learned anything it’s that good woodworkers will generally only make minor mistakes, and will always be able to find a solution. I think it’s better to try and fix mistakes than to start all over again- taking a perfectionist’s route will get you good results but less experience in problem solving.

Anyway I’ve gotten a bit off topic, but I really do wish that I could share more details about where I work and what I do- it pains me. What I can share is that I got yet another lateral promotion. My boss said I earned the spot and commended my work. I can honestly say I’m the happiest I’ve been at my job since starting in aerospace- I’ve built good relationships with the people in my section and I have the job I wanted all along.

That said I haven’t had much time to visit my shop and work on my personal projects. I’ve been unhappy with that situation, and so I’ve kind of only felt half fulfilled. I’m hoping to improve on that during my vacation time, and I’ll be packing up house over the next three- six months and moving somewhere new- with the intent of getting my shop space MUCH closer than a 30 min. drive away. I can’t wait to just pop into the shop at a moment’s notice. What a dream that will be!

 

Vlogging here I come…first vlog post!

3 Jun

Okay so it’s been forever and a day since I’ve posted to this blog- but it’s because I’ve been trying to wrap my head around video blogging! The learning curve is steep. Did my brain grow three sizes? No. But it sure was taxed with all kinds of new information on how to record, edit and post a video. While I cringe at the results I’m gonna go ahead and share the video with you anyway because I’m *fearless* hahaha.

One small detail I left out during the shop tour was that I keep an air compressor tucked away under my table saw. When I need it I flip the on switch and I have a hose that hangs under my work bench that reaches to any and all far corners of my tiny shop.

I hope you enjoyed the first instalment and stay tuned for more (it gets better).

P.S. If anyone wants to give me any tips on how they compress and upload their videos- I’m all ears.

What’s getting by your Danger Radar?

1 May

It’s safety day!

I have to say one of the biggest fears I have as a woodworker involves lobbing off a finger. I feel superstitious even writing those words! I’ll stop to knock on wood – there that’s better. But the point is, I think I know enough to be afraid of tools that could accomplish such a feat. However I feel that many dangers go overlooked. The ones that live under the radar are far more prone to lead to accidents.

I’ll give two such examples from accidents that occurred at work recently. One was a router accident. I consider palm routers specifically to live under the danger radar. They are so easily manipulated- heck you can be charmed into using them one handed when you see how well they fit in the hand, and how well they perform at so many tasks. Palm routers at my work are used almost as frequently as you might use a utility knife.I think this breeds the complacency that allows a dangerous tool to slip under our danger radar. Imagine how shocked everyone was when what was supposed to be a routine procedure led to 30 stitches.

The person involved had set up a straight edge and their router with a flush trim bit. The problem was that they had failed to notice that their cutter was out too far which meant that instead of the cutter riding up against the straight edge guided by the bearing, the cutter sunk right into the straight edge because the bearing had nothing to register against. This led to problem number two. Because we are taught to either have someone hold a vacuum hose while we cut, or hold it ourselves- which was the method used at the time of the accident- the person only had one hand free to deal with a router kick back. The router wrested itself from that hand and skipped over the other arm cutting a jagged path over the forearm.  The wound, I was told, was 1/2″ wide by 1/4″ deep and roughly 6″ in length. Someone told me it looked like the work of an animal. Thankfully the story ends well in that there was no serious damage done to tendons, nerves, or arteries. A full recovery is expected. Yes this mainly happened due to lack of attention, but also due to giving a palm router less credit than it should have as a danger in the shop. This thing has a cutter on the end that spins at 30,000 rpm why do we think one handed operation will suffice? Because we are convinced it’s manageable.  I have since decided to at all costs avoid holding my palm router with one hand- much like we are taught to keep both hands on a chisel to avoid terrible results.

The next tale is a bit of a surprise frankly. Even the most savvy woodworkers may not have seen this coming. We use super glue very often at work. It’s a staple. We fill syringes with the glue to apply it with perfect accuracy and also in the hopes of better controlling the volume of glue to be applied. Everyone knows to be very careful not to stab themselves with these syringes, and we certainly know to be careful with the glue itself, as it works in an instant, and is super strong. We have solvent for the super glue, but it takes a lot of persuading to properly UN-glue something- even with the solvent.What flew under the radar, then you ask? When getting the bottle out of a storage cabinet, a co-worker had failed to notice that the bottle’s top was not on properly. I don’t know the exact circumstances that followed but what I do know is the bottle spilled down the person’s shirt. The shirt then began to smoke! That’s right it was in the early stages of combusting! Someone had to use an extinguisher to remedy the situation. I don’t even know if there were further complications from the accident- like did the glue manage to contact the person’s skin etc. I have to say even after that accident, I have still found bottles with their tops not properly fastened.

How’s your danger radar? I say we all have to think hard about what it is that our danger radar isn’t picking up on a day to day basis in the shop. I realise we can’t stop to analyse every little thing we do for the danger in it, but there surely are a few things that once upon a time were on your danger radar, and have since fallen by the wayside. Maybe it’s a simple matter of not using personal protection equipment, or using short-cuts that are higher risk just to avoid setting up another machine. It’s different for everyone. And no one is perfect. That’s the reason we need to stay on top of shop safety. Safe woodworking to all!

Here are some links to other posts I’ve written on shop safety:

https://warpedboards.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/safety-week-at-work-13/

https://warpedboards.wordpress.com/2011/03/22/lessons-from-woodworking-school-part-2/

https://warpedboards.wordpress.com/2012/09/03/cowboy-carpentry-a-confession/

https://warpedboards.wordpress.com/2012/03/01/the-thorn-in-this-lions-paw/

I have a tool habit… and I work with geniuses

6 Apr

Hey friends! I have more on tools today! I bought a little box of goodies from Lee Valley again. I also worked on my dust collection system, and I have a little bit of genius jury rigging to share with you from work.

First up; dust collection! I am a little annoyed to admit that I’ve bought a bunch of dust fittings that for some reason are not made to fit to standard sized vac hoses or the dust ports of my machines. Even the dust separator lid I’d bought had some weird sized fittings. So I finally had it out with all these fittings and cobbled together solutions for ALL of the machines I’d bought them for!

I've been carefully avoiding large chips with my vacuum because they clog the 1 1/4" hose very easily.

I’ve been carefully avoiding large chips with my vacuum because they clog the 1 1/4″ hose very easily.

Well I finally found a solution and cleaned the entire shop.

Well after a near melt down, I came to  a solution and cleaned the entire shop.

So I bought the lid a while back but only got around to modifying it recently. The fittings were stepped and I had to cut off the smaller steps to get my hoses to fit.

I bought this dust separator lid a while back and have finally got it hooked up. The fittings were stepped and I had to cut off the smaller steps to get my hoses to fit. I used my  bandsaw to slice the steps off, then followed up on the edge sander. Now everything fits!

It's hard to make out but there are all kinds of debris in here that easily would have clogged my vac hose! Now I have to come up with a solution to keep the bucket from tipping over every other second. I'm thinking of making a rolling base that will hold my shop vac and the separator.

It’s hard to make out but there are all kinds of debris in here that easily would have clogged my vac hose! Now I have to come up with a solution to keep the bucket from tipping over every other second. I’m thinking of making a rolling base that will hold my shop vac and the separator.

And here’s a bit on what I bought from Lee Valley:

I finally bought a set of guide bushings for my router, and an inlay kit while I was at it.

I finally bought a set of guide bushings for my router, and an inlay kit while I was at it.

I was rather disappointed with the small size of this package, but at least it will give me a start on practicing my marquetry. And I have the lamp shade in line as my next project.

I was rather disappointed with the small size of these veneer sheets, but at least it will give me a start on practicing my marquetry. And I have a lamp shade project in mind for this that I’ll start on soon!

Can't say I'll buy these scraps again though.

Can’t say I’ll buy these scraps again though.

Okay so ever since I saw a video of Frank Klausz cutting a mortise with one of these I knew I would need to try it myself.

Okay so ever since I saw a video of Frank Klausz cutting a mortise with one of these I knew I would need to try it myself.

And finally I was at work yesterday and I was simply dazzled by a jig my co-worker had made. I asked him if I could take photos and he was happy to share his idea. EVERYONE should build one of these!!!!

Check out this edge trimming jig! There is even thought put into deflecting the chips with a piece of plexi-glass

Check out this edge trimming jig! There is even thought put into deflecting the chips with a piece of plexi-glass

Here you can see the router bit, which has a bearing and is lined up just a hair below the surface of the mdf fence.

Here you can see the router bit, which has a bearing and is lined up just a hair below the surface of the mdf fence.

From the side you can see that the mdf is relieved from the mdf right where the edging rides up against the router base

From the side you can see that the mdf is relieved with a groove right where the edging rides up against the router base

So if you didn’t already notice the last photo shows it very well, the whole jig is made with the edge guide that comes with your router! Simply screw on a piece of mdf that you’ve made a hole in for the bit, and a groove in that allows the edging to pass freely by the fence, and voila! The perfect edge trimming jig. I couldn’t get enough of his demonstrating  how easy it was to use, he barely had to lift a finger and his edge was knocked down to a hair above the surface.

Woodworkers are a clever pack of friendly creatures.

Moving on up…it’s a scary business

27 Mar

The dynamics at my job have changed for me quite a bit in the last couple of months. While I’ve stayed in the section that builds the galley kitchen of the plane, my actual position has switched around several times. I started off about a year and bit ago building the drawers of the galley, then moved on to building the galley structure above the counter. That first switch kept me from quitting, so it was a welcomed change. More recently I changed positions again. I still work on the structure above the counter but now instead of building from scratch, I’m fitting and fine tuning elements. It takes a lot of patience and precision, but I really like it. I’ve found it to be a huge contrast to my two previous positions where I had to be precise but build quickly and do quite a lot of heavy and messy work.

And finally to current day, where I’ve  signed on to learn yet another position. It’s the position that follows the one I work on now. I will be adding the veneer and wooden moldings to the structure above the counter. When I originally started working in aerospace this is the type of position I was after, so I’m quite pleased that it’s only taken a year and a bit to get here. I had graduated from woodworking school a mere 6 months before snagging this job and had only accumulated 6 months of woodworking experience in the interim. This all meant that even though I had wanted a veneering position straight off the bat, I certainly wasn’t going to beat out people that had years of experience over me. And the company wasn’t going to take it on faith that I was a good worker. I’m actually glad to have had the experience of the previous positions, because it has given me a more broad understanding of the process. Plus I have slowly but surely proved myself at work through consistency and by showing up to work everyday with the intent to do my best. Mistakes happen, but the intent was there. There are people many that show up to work with the intent to do the minimum required of them, and their mistakes turn out worse as they come from a place of apathy.  The good news it that I will be in great company for my new position. No apathetically inclined individuals work there.

I have to say that my experience working at a large company has proven invaluable. It has been at the same time terrifying and liberating to have the ability to change positions frequently. Terrifying because it is out of my comfort zone to keep diving head first into the unknown, but liberating because I have found that each new change has brought rewards with it. And so I will keep trying to say yes instead of no when new opportunities arise at work. Though this hasn’t translated to every aspect of my life, I see now that it probably should, and maybe I’ll work on that!

The mock up… rebuilding my pride

24 Mar

So I wanted to dust this blog post under the rug because I messed up (to a degree) on some of my table joints.  My execution was darned sloppy and I was a little frustrated because technically speaking it should have worked. I set up my table legs at the drill press with stop blocks and clamps and drilled for the mortises.

A mortise should live within these lines

A mortise should live within these lines

So far so good

So far so good

And somehow my set up let the forstner bit travel outside the lines.

And somehow my set up let the forstner bit travel outside the lines. I’m still trying to figure out if my setup failed, or if my drill press is somehow out of alignment.

The perfectionist in me wanted to reverse time and/or restart from scratch. But alas I just had to deal with it. So I did my best to square them up with chisels

The perfectionist in me wanted to reverse time and/or restart from scratch. But alas I just had to deal with it. So I did my best to square them up with chisels

As it stands now I still have quite a bit of fitting left, but the good news is that the shoulders of the rails should cover up any trace of the mishapen mortises! Hooray for that!

As it stands now I still have quite a bit of fitting left, but the good news is that the shoulders of the rails should cover up any trace of the misshapen mortises! Hooray for that!

I was glad that I'd only tackled the joints for one table and so I can try to better my performance on the next two tables! After I fit the disgraceful batch of joints I'll tend to these dovetail joints next.

I was glad that I’d only tackled the joints for one table and so I can try to better my performance on the next two tables! After I fit the disgraceful batch of joints I’ll address these dovetail joints next.

Since I need a little motivation to get over my goof I decided to roughly assemble the table to see how it will eventually look. oooh I can't wait! I DO look forward to getting on with it now.

Since I need a little motivation to get over my goof I decided to roughly assemble the table to see how it will eventually look. oooh I can’t wait! I DO look forward to getting on with it now.

And finally here is the view from sketch up that I originally planned. Looks good so far, but I still have a lot of joints to figure out as I go. Not sure how I want the top to attach or even the drawer!

And finally here is the view from sketch up that I originally planned. Looks good so far, but I still have a lot of joints to figure out as I go. Not sure how I want the top to attach or even the drawer!

It’s funny how something that actually won’t end up effecting the finished piece and won’t be seen can really nag at a woodworker. I feel like a soccer player who has built up their performance and then ends up scoring on their own net. Boo.  Thankfully I conclude this blog post with a positive mind. Everyday at work I take pride in making the least amount of mistakes possible. But when I do make minor slip-ups I work my hardest to rectify matters and move on. So I will try to do the same here! I look forward to completing this table and NOT pointing out any of the mistakes future onlookers when they view the finished piece.

Norm Abram and his dadoes…

19 Mar

I’ve been watching a lot of New Yankee Workshop of late. The show is addictive. I admit I really only watched it back in the day, so I have tons to catch up on. Lucky for me! I would LOVE to own the complete series, but it costs 3K. All of us Norm lovers should get together and find a way to get a box set in production for the average consumer’s budget.  I think if it was available it would fly off the shelves. After rekindling my love for the show decades later, I also found a second New Yankee workshop book at a thrift shop to add to my library;

http://www.amazon.ca/Mostly-Shaker-From-Yankee-Workshop/dp/0316004758

if you’re interested this is the first book I acquired a year or so ago:

http://www.amazon.ca/The-Yankee-Workshop-Norm-Abram/dp/0316004545

All this to say- I’ve been watching Norm work away and I noticed that dadoes are a favourite of his. And I can’t fault him on that, dadoes and grooves are very useful in so many situations. I’d actually like to incorporate more of them into my projects. Usually I’d use a router, simply because I don’t yet own a dado set. But I have to admit I envy the simplicity of dadoing on the table saw and I recall how useful dado sets were during my schooling. I think a dado stack is in my near future. But of course because I have a SawStop I also have to factor in the cost of a dado brake cartridge and a zero clearance insert. It will be a costly addition to the shop, but I’m certain I won’t regret it. Now the question is which dado set should I go with? I want to make sure I have a good set that doesn’t leave steps in the cut, or tears through the cut resulting in excessive blow out.  Anyone know of a reliable set for clean flat-bottomed  dado cuts?

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